THE VINTAGE FERRARI SPECIALIST

Monterey V

August 28, 2015


monterey2015_35

I had one more show to attend, and it was the Ferrari Club of America National Show in Monterey. This year’s show was in Monterey on Monday following Pebble Beach weekend which happens once every 10 years. It was part of a celebration of Ferraris that convinced us to have so many GTEs come to gather in Monterey!

This morning, all GTE owners walked a little taller and were a little prouder of their cars because the night before, a very nice GTE sold for $725K at the Gooding auction. With the buyer’s premium, nearly $800K was spent on a Ferrari 250 GTE, perhaps setting a new world record for the model! The car that sold was a freshly restored car with only minor detailing issues, so I think it was deserving of a high auction bid, but even I was surprised at the result. Although this auction result does not mean every decent GTE should be priced above $700K, it does mean people will be looking closer at GTEs as a Vintage Ferrari worthy of buying and owning in their collections.

Over 15 years ago when I first started my research into GTEs, I met Len Miller, the founder of the 250GTE Registry, and he often told us the story about how GTE’s received very little respect in the Ferrari club in the early 80s when he started the Registry. Through the years we became good friends, and we all built great friendships that continues today in the GTE Registry with Tom Wilson and David Wheeler at the helm. Len passed away several years ago, but I know wherever he is, he’s smiling down on us and his beloved GTEs gaining the respect he fought for all those years ago. Here’s to you Len!

monterey2015_17

Of the three Ferraris I had to present on the show field, I only had to have one car judged by the FCA. I found this 330 America for Michael over 10 years ago in the Bay Area and have been caring for the car ever since. It’s a very original car with original paint and much of its chrome is original. Francois and I rebuilt the engine, but tried our best to preserve the rest of the car. Unfortunately, the interior suffered from the hot California sun and couldn’t be saved, but we entered it in preservation class to celebrate it’s originality. We also entered the car in normal judging to get a base line in scoring so if Michael decides to continue having the car judged, we would have a guideline for improvements.

monterey2015_20

Michael was truly surprised when he found out we won an award for his car, especially since he left early to join his wife for lunch in Carmel! I graciously accepted the award for his car in Platinum Preservation over all the other cars in attendance. We may not have scored enough to place in a regular award, but I thought the car was deserving of the recognition in Preservation Class! What a great way to wrap up the Monterey week. Congratulations to the Greenspans!

Monterey IV

August 27, 2015


monterey2015_31

Sunday was Pebble Beach, and it began with “Dawn Patrol,” Hagerty Insurance’s free hat giveaway for the diehard enthusiasts that arrive at the Pebble Beach Concours at the crack of dawn. It started out with just a handful of mechanics and drivers that were put to task of delivering their customer’s cars to the show field to easily hundreds of early risers wearing the badge of honor of a “Dawn Patrol Hat.” I arrived at about 7am, early enough to see this year’s hat was red, but didn’t participate in the mad scramble when the hats were given out!

monterey2015_32

Every year Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance seems to to get more and more crowded, and this year was no different. Even a $350 dollar ticket didn’t seem to keep the thousands of people from attending. I try my best to arrive early to have an unobstructed view of the cars, but even at 7 am, I found a lot of people already on the show field.

monterey2015_33

It was crunch time for many restorers. Pebble Beach is like the Super Bowl of car shows, so all the cars on the show field had to be perfect and ready for judging. Everyone was working furiously to get their cars ready including Bob Smith of Coachworks showing the boss will roll up his sleeves and do what it takes to get it done!

monterey2015_34

There was a California Spyder that was on display that was some kind of “survivor car,” and I’m starting to get tired of dirty cars being shown at car shows to prove that it’s a “survivor.” I admit I don’t know the history of this car, but I feel there is absolutely no reason for a car to remain dirty to prove it provenance! In the last several years, survivor cars have started to become more popular than restored cars, and their prices have been rising. Whenever there is a demand for something, there will always be someone filling the need, so I’ve seen a lot of dusty, dirty, and neglected cars being paraded around as a “survivor.”

Several years ago when the Ferrari Club of America was establishing guidelines for its new “Prevervation Class” I had many discussion with judges to understand what they were looking for. The best description I heard was “a preservation car should be a car that shows signs of loving care throughout its life like any prized possession.” Why would I want to see car that the owner barely cared enough to wash it? There is big difference between patina and dirt, and people showing cars should know the difference. I also see a lot of this with cars for sale, but that is the showmanship of a dealer or auction house selling to people who don’t understand what “survivor” really means. I really wish we could stop this nonsense.

Monterey III

August 26, 2015


monterey2015_12

Saturday’s Concorso Italiano attracted 19 GTEs and 3 330 Americas, for a total of 22 cars, a new record of attendance! It was great to see all the minor differences in the cars and compare them with one another, but the biggest thrill was meeting all the owners and sharing in all the individual stories. Every one of the 22 cars had a special story about how the owner came about owning their Ferrari, and I was honored to be a part of so many.

monterey2015_13

My favorite story was about Rick Granzella’s purchase of his GTE when it was new in 1962. As a young successful engineer, Rick had enough money to buy a new Ferrari from the showroom in California. He took his family over to the dealership to pick out a car when parked next to a brand new Ferrari 250GTE was a Ferrari 250GTO for practically same price! Knowing all about the performance of a GTO, Rick knew which car he wanted to buy with his money, but his wife reminded him a two-seat race car was no place for family with a young son and a car seat. Eventually the wife’s voice of reason won out and Rick drove home in his new Ferrari GTE.

Years later and many miles of enjoyment later, the senior Granzella decided it was time to restore his family’s Ferrari. As the cost of restoration mounted and he started getting push back from his wife, he politely reminded her the restoration of a 250GTO would have cost the same, but the value of the GTO would have been over 1200 times what they paid for their GTE!

Rick introduced me to his son at Concorso last week, and the reason for buying his GTE over the GTO! I thought it was great how he was probably the only original owner of a GTE that I knew of, and I loved hearing about all the family experiences they had with their car. I also pointed out their ownership history might have been very different if they actually bought the GTO. Very few owners would have kept a GTO for so long because of the exponential rise in prices. I asked if they bought the GTO, when would they have decided it was time to sell? In the 70s, they were 10 times what they would have paid for it. By the early 80s, it was 300 times, and by the end of the decade, they were easily 500 times the original price. If you believe today’s prices, a GTO would be worth nearly 3000 times its original purchase price! I know plenty of previous owners of GTOs that sold many years ago. They all speak fondly of their ownership, but all of them sold when they thought they were making some good money. What the Granzella’s have is much more, which transcends profit. They have a Ferrari that has brought great joy and memories for the family, and I’m sure the GTE will never be sold because the memories are priceless!

monterey2015_14

The nice thing about going to Monterey is all the big names in the car world are usually somewhere on the peninsula, the trick is trying to meet up with them! Here’s Marcell Massini (center) and Wayne Ausbrooks (right) at Concorso. I was able to stop Marcel just long enough from taking notes on all the Ferraris to pose for a picture!

5053_99Photo: D Wheeler

I was honored to drive my car up to the reviewing stand to talk about my car at Concorso. My car was not the nicest or cleanest car on the show field, but the guys felt I played a part in getting all the cars together for this event, so I obliged.

 

A funny side story about my car was I spent some time in the last couple months making my car a little bit more reliable so she wouldn’t let me down in California. I had the radiator core replaced so it wouldn’t overheat. I installed a secondary fuel pump to make sure the carburetors would not vapor lock in the heat, and I also upgraded the starter so the engine would reliably start every time. All three of these issues often arise when idling in line waiting to approach the reviewing stand of a big car show, and I can’t imagine the embarrassment in front of all those people with any one of these mechanical failures. My 330 America was doing very well as I waited my turn, but as I wend over a bump, the windshield wipers started to run on their own! I knew exactly what it was, but didn’t have time to fix it now!

The Lucas wiper motor has a park feature so when you turn off the wipers, it will continue to run until it brings the wipers to a lower point to park tight to the windshield. I knew the contacts to the park circuit were a little dodgy, but it was my luck for the wiper to act up as I was heading to the reviewing stand! I managed to get the wipers to stop moving, but it was too late to jump out of the car and manually push the wipers down, so all the pictures of my car would have to be with my wipers at half mast!

monterey2015_15

There was a GTE parked among the 22 in attendance that I didn’t seem to know, and the owner was not around all day. I asked around and soon found out it belonged to Rick Bunkfeldt, a legendary engine builder from Wisconsin. His reputation is whispered among Ferrari GTO owners, and is known for building some of the most powerful Vintage Ferrari engines on the track, so I was hoping I would get a chance to meet him. After introductions, I was honored to learn that Bunkfeldt knew of me and my website and was happy to talk about his car.

monterey2015_16

When he popped the hood of his personal GTE, he showed us an engine with a 6 carburetor set up! Rick explained this car was his “test mule” to see how much horsepower he could get out of a stock looking 250 engine with the only outward appearance being the extra carburetors. He said he was getting 300 horsepower on his dyno at 9200 rpm using stock rods, and a standard bore! After absorbing this information, I asked a half a dozen questions that only blew me away with Rick’s responses. It’s well known Bunkfeldt builds 3 liter Ferrari engines that pull over 400 horsepower using trick rods and valve train materials, but building a stock engine with its original 6-1 header to 300 hp was more impressive to me. I wish there was more time to talk with this engine builder, but he had to get back to the track where most of his work was waiting. I hope one day I’ll get a ride in his hot-rod GTE and maybe see his shop where it all happens, but what a treat to meet a Vintage Ferrari engine builder that was really “in the trenches” building some power in these engines!

Monterey II



This year, the schedule at Monterey was a little different, so I was a little lost as to what to do. Every year there are more and more shows to see and activities to do, so it gets harder and harder to do all the things I enjoy plus the new things added to the roster. The big change was Concorso Italiano moved their show to Saturday of Monterey weekend, so the scheduling conflict with the Quail Show was eliminated. Unfortunately, Saturday was usually earmarked for a day at the track at Laguna Seca, so eliminating one conflict created another one.

monterey2015_26

I decided to miss the Quail Event to spend some time at the track and see some friends that I may otherwise never get a chance to see.

monterey2015_27

I also found some time to look at some of the cars being offered at auction at the Gooding tent. They had two very different GTEs being offered for sale. One being a quasi “barn find” and the second one was a very nicely restored car.

monterey2015_30

I believe the blue GTE ended up breaking an auction record for these models at $725K hammer! With an auction estimated in the $500-600K range, I would say this car was well sold!

monterey2015_9

After running around town trying to meet everyone, and see all the cars, I had one major task to complete for the day, and that was to deliver three cars to the lawn at Concorso. The organizers were allowing us to set the cars on Friday, the afternoon before the show to beat the morning rush. Traffic in Monterey gets worse and worse every year, and the irony is for a weekend devoted to automobiles, it is not fun to try to drive one around town! Since we had access to a transporter for the week, we decided it was easier to have the truck unload the cars at the show which made my driving three cars onto the show field much easier!

David Wheeler and Tom Wilson, the keepers of the GTE Registry did a great job organizing the GTE Gathering, printing signs, and arranging the order of the cars. It was a very nice display.

monterey2015_7

After getting my few cars parked, we had one more car to get the show field in Seaside: the much anticipated arrival of Tom Wilson’s white GTE. It was trucked up from LA after Zac Dugger and the guys bashed away on this car for the last several months trying not to miss this show. Tom Wilson had his whole family in Monterey for the unveiling, and the trip to Concorso started at a hanger in the Monterey airport.

monterey2015_6.

The car looked great, and despite a few things that still needed to be done on the car, she was here in the flesh, ready for her drive onto the show field.

 

monterey2015_11

The biggest smile was on Tom Wilson’s face because he was finally sitting behind the wheel of his GTE with his family attending their first concours together. Good for you Tom!

 

Monterey I

August 24, 2015


monterey2015_3

I arrived in Monterey the Wednesday before Pebble Beach weekend, and scrambled all over town to secure tickets, check into hotels, and to start calling all my friends that were arriving into town. The first event was to meet Tom Wilson at a house they rented on Highway 1, just south of Carmel. The house had a spectacular view of the Pacific Ocean and a front row seat of the Thursday morning Pebble Beach Tour at the bottom of its driveway!

monterey2015_4

As we were watching the tour, I got a call from one of my customers that owns a  275GTB/4. He brought his car out to Monterey, and was using his Ferrari to get around to all the events on the Peninsula. Unfortunately, the car was missing a little bit and he called me to see if there was anything I could do. Working on a car far away from the shop is always a hit or miss endeavor, but I was willing to take a look, so I asked Matt to bring it by the house.

Tom Wilson’s house guests were all pretty new to the Monterey car scene, so they were very excited to see a Ferrari 275GTB/4 pull up the winding driveway. To give them perspective, the car was worth the same as the cliff top house we were staying in!

I set to work trying to figure out the miss in the engine. I was hoping it would be a simple fix like a loose spark plug wire or bad spark plug, but it wasn’t looking so easy. My attempt to diagnosis the car was made harder with an audience that had more confidence in my abilities than I had! Roadside repairs can often be hampered by what spare parts you have on hand, or not having the correct tool to complete what would normally be a simple task at the shop.

My process of elimination eventually led me to look inside the distributor cap, and there was my problem. A point set spring had broken, and three plugs were not firing. Realizing this fix was not going to happen without another set of points, I started reviewing my options. I knew Francois was at the track, and they would definitely have a spare points set, but I would have to find him and arrange to get them over to Carmel. As I was thinking, Tom Wilson pulled all the spare parts he had for his GTE and found a bag of used points sets. Three sets were broken just like the one I fished out of Matt’s distributor, but we found a set that was still intact! It was not the freshest set of points, but with a borrowed nail file from one of the house guests, we were in business.

I didn’t have feeler gauges to set the point gap, but set it by sight and ear as I spun the distributor in my hand. It was not perfect, but would get Matt up and running for the weekend until I could fix everything properly when we got home.

In celebration of having his car repaired, Matt agreed to take anyone at the house for a ride in his GTB, and there was no lack of takers!

monterey2015_5

Friday night was my annual Monterey Cocktail Party at Quail Lodge. With easily over 100 people in attendance, I think it has become a destination for many Vintage Ferrari Fans and Owners and I was happy to see so many old friends and make so many new ones. Thanks for coming!

330 Engine Assembly

August 10, 2015


6097_52

With the cars on their way to Monterey, I had a week off before heading out to California to join the cars in the festivities. That didn’t mean, however, we didn’t have plenty of work to do at the shop! Yale’s 330 engine is going back together because a new set of camshafts arrived from the camshaft manufacturer. New camshafts were made to replace a previous set that had some alignment issues, but these look good and everything seems to be order.

The cams were installed, along with the rocker stands. The side play in the rocker assemblies were checked and anything that was out of spec was brought back into tolerance.

6097_53

After the heads were assembled, they were prepped for installation on the block. We’re still able to get these Australian made head gaskets that do a much better job sealing the heads than the Elrings we had so much trouble with several years ago, but the rumor on the street is the Australian supply is about to run out. I heard the company that made these gaskets was sold, and the new owners dissolved the gasket manufacturing division. So far the contact in Australia has not been able to find a manufacturer to make these gaskets to his specifications, so when the stock from our supplier runs out…

I still spray on silicone copper sealant on the gasket for an added level of security to insure the water passageways seal on these gaskets. If you’ve had problems like we did several years ago with bad head gaskets, you would be just as cautious!

6097_54

Before setting the heads down onto the block, I had to make sure the cam was indexed correctly so nothing would touch. The crank and camshafts at this point are not connected so care has to taken to avoid interference and damage to the parts.

6097_56

With a new camshaft, there are no marks to line up with the factory pointer to even roughly install the heads, so everything has to be set up from scratch.

6097_55

valve timing
Once the heads were installed, and the camshaft chain is installed at PM 1/6, I began the process of timing in the camshafts to the flywheel. The “AA” marks and “CS” marks on the flywheel are for the valve timing.  It’s a process Francois has shown me before how to set valve timing, but only when he was performing the process himself. This time, however, he let me do it while he watched over me. It’s a procedure that lines the camshafts precisely with the crankshaft so the valve timing is accurate to the position of the pistons. Since these camshafts were new, we needed to accurately fit them to this engine. The chain and sprocket assembly allows for a very precise alignment, but this flexibility also allows a lot of room for error, even with new parts. This issue also affects older engines because any change to the engine will affect the relationship of the cam sprocket to the crank pulley. As the chain stretches, the slack is taken up by the tensioner, but that will change the position of the cam. As engines are rebuilt, heads are machined, and any material removed will change the distance of the head to the centerline of the crank, also affecting the cam sprocket position. We have also seen a bunch of cams that develop a twist through the years, so finding the best compromise so the valves open and close when they are supposed to is also a reason to check cam timing.

The procedure involves checking when the intake is about to open (AA marks), and checking when the exhaust valves are just beginning to close (CS marks). Since a Ferrari engine is timed like two 6 cylinder engines, the front cylinder’s valves on one bank is 360 degrees out from the back cylinders, so the valve timing can be checked from front to back. Lining up the cam sprocket bolt holes once the cam is in the correct position involves jumping 7 teeth at the chain sprocket for every degree of movement. It probably sounds as confusing as I’m describing, but makes more sense when you see it being performed.

Although I successfully timed in Yale’s engine correctly for the first time by myself, I knew I needed a lot more practice. When Francois learned how to do this at the factory in the 60s, he repeated the process on dozens of V-12 engines at a time, and then spent the last 50 years working on hundreds of Ferrari engines. We may do this two to three times a year at the shop, so I may never get as good as Francois!

6097_57

With the cams timed, the bolts were tightened on the sprockets, and I moved onto the next task of the assembly process.

6097_60

Yale had another shop install “Pertronix” ignition modules on his distributors several years ago. I find these things are a mixed blessing, and I called him to see what he wanted to do.
“I love them, and I would like to keep them.” Is what Yale said when I called.
The problem I had is I didn’t install these modules, and I did not disassemble the engine when the distributors were removed, so everything will have to timed to work properly. Even though the concept of the magnetic pick ups on the Pertronix system is nothing more than a switch, I’ll have to figure out how to trigger them to find the precise moment they trigger a spark event. It would have been so much easier with set of old fashioned points!

6097_59

The previous shop made marks on the distributor to show where each spark event should occur, but just like the camshafts, Ferrari allowed many adjustments to precisely align the points in time with the engine. The alignment of these components are much easier to do with the engine out of the car, and even easier if I can statically set the distributors before firing up the engine. I heard you can put these pick ups on a meter to see when they are triggering, but I’ll have to do some more research.

6097_61

While I scratched my head about the distributors, I test fitted the valve covers and cam chain covers. When everything lined up, I fitted the gaskets, checked the head torque, and installed the valve covers.

 

 

Monterey Car Shows

I’m all registered and ready to attend Concorso on Saturday 15th of August and the FCA event on Monday August 17th. Please contact Concorso, or the FCA to register for their respective events.

We’re planning a tailgate party after the show at Concorso to avoid the traffic leaving the show. There’s nothing worse that sitting in bumper to bumper traffic watching the car overheat trying to leave Concorso at the end of the day, so since all the GTEs and 330 Americas will already be parked together, we can stay a little later and leave when the traffic dies down. As always, everyone is invited!

If you want more information on the car shows contact:

David Wheeler, Editor of GTE Newsletter : David@Ferrari250GTE.com

Tom Wilson, Registrar of GTE Newsletter : tom@ferrari250gte.com

Tom Yang, Webmaster of tomyang.net : tom@tomyang.net

 

At last count, there will be 19 GTEs and 3 330 Americas! If you have one of these cars, don’t miss the opportunity to join us!

 

Here’s a rough schedule of events:

 

Thursday August 13th, Tomyang.net Cocktail Party at Quail Lodge 6-9 (I will confirm exact time as I book the venue)

Saturday August 15th, Concorso Italiano Gathering of the GTEs (and 330 Americas)

Monday August 17th, Ferrari Club National Show and Concours.

 

The Thursday early evening Tomyang.net event is open to all and begins roughly at 5:30 and goes until 8ish. There will be appetizers and a cash bar. It makes a great meeting place to connect with old and new friends and plan for the week ahead. See you there!

 

quailterrace

 

I also plan on trying out Twitter again to see if it will work for our group in Monterey. Follow me at tomyangnet on twitter, and you’ll be able to keep up with where we all are over the week. I’ll try to get it started in the next week or so.

Last Minute Preparation for Monterey

August 8, 2015


5053_98

I spent last weekend getting all the cars ready for the gathering in Monterey. I got my car as clean as she’s going to get with the amount of time I had because I had more pressing matters…

2953_28

I took my customer’s GTE out for a spin, and noticed one of the calipers was hanging up. I tried to see if it would free up, but every time I got it to release, it would soon hang up again. The timing couldn’t have been worse, and I had to review my options. It was a left rear caliper, and could probably make it off the truck and onto the show field, but I really didn’t want to represent a car that wasn’t 100%. Luckily, I had another GTE at the shop with working rear calipers that was not going to this show. I pulled the rear caliper pistons, swapped them over to this car, and bled the brakes. When I get back from Monterey, we’ll address the brake system more thoroughly.

2953_27

Since the brake system was drained, it was easy to take the brake reservoir off and paint it. Some brake fluid was causing the paint to peel. Even though this was a tougher epoxy paint, it was no match for DOT 3/4 brake fluid!

monterey2015_1

I was up early on Saturday morning bleeding the brakes on GTE so it would be ready for the truck heading west for Monterey. I had three spots reserved on this truck and three other guys in the Boston area reserved the other three spots, so we had our own truck for the trip.

monterey2015_2

It was pretty neat to have two 330 Americas, and two GTEs on the same truck that I had knew intimately. These cars will be joining 20 some odd sister cars in a week or so at Concorso!

 

 

Monterey Car Shows

I’m all registered and ready to attend Concorso on Saturday 15th of August and the FCA event on Monday August 17th. Please contact Concorso, or the FCA to register for their respective events.

We’re planning a tailgate party after the show at Concorso to avoid the traffic leaving the show. There’s nothing worse that sitting in bumper to bumper traffic watching the car overheat trying to leave Concorso at the end of the day, so since all the GTEs and 330 Americas will already be parked together, we can stay a little later and leave when the traffic dies down. As always, everyone is invited!

If you want more information on the car shows contact:

David Wheeler, Editor of GTE Newsletter : David@Ferrari250GTE.com

Tom Wilson, Registrar of GTE Newsletter : tom@ferrari250gte.com

Tom Yang, Webmaster of tomyang.net : tom@tomyang.net

 

At last count, there will be 19 GTEs and 3 330 Americas! If you have one of these cars, don’t miss the opportunity to join us!

 

Here’s a rough schedule of events:

 

Thursday August 13th, Tomyang.net Cocktail Party at Quail Lodge 6-9 (I will confirm exact time as I book the venue)

Saturday August 15th, Concorso Italiano Gathering of the GTEs (and 330 Americas)

Monday August 17th, Ferrari Club National Show and Concours.

 

The Thursday early evening Tomyang.net event is open to all and begins roughly at 5:30 and goes until 8ish. There will be appetizers and a cash bar. It makes a great meeting place to connect with old and new friends and plan for the week ahead. See you there!

 

quailterrace

 

I also plan on trying out Twitter again to see if it will work for our group in Monterey. Follow me at tomyangnet on twitter, and you’ll be able to keep up with where we all are over the week. I’ll try to get it started in the next week or so.

Chicago Project Car

August 2, 2015


 

5763_1

I was contacted by a person who won an E-bay auction for a Series I 330 GT 2+2. The car was in Chicago, and the buyer wanted to ship the car to the UK. I was asked to help inventory, prepare, and load the car onto a container to ship overseas, The timing was not the greatest, as I was trying my best to get several cars prepared to ship out to Monterey, but I knew I was probably the best person to do this job, so I juggled my schedule around to accommodate the buyer to spend a couple of days in Chicago!

5763_2

The shop where the car was stored was in complete disarray. Most of the Ferrari parts were grouped on a few shelves, but it was clear the parts were moved several times since its disassembly. Nothing was labeled or organized so we had a lot of work ahead of us. The shop was a bit of a hobby shop, where the owner employed people to “restore” cars, but there was no focus. There were Fords, Ferraris, Rolls Royces, and Porsches, all partially disassembled and co-mingled on shelves and piles on the floor.

5763_3

The first task was to get the frame and body on wheels since the suspension was removed. We bought the strongest wheels I could find at the local home center, built a substructure out of lumber, and strapped the frame to it.

I discovered the owner had ordered a 20 foot sea container to ship the car and the parts to the UK. Having moved my car several years ago when it was largely disassembled, I knew 20 feet was not a lot of room. The car is 16 feet long by itself!

5763_4

With the car on wheels, I decided the best plan of attack was to install as many of the parts back on the car to save room in the container. The engine, radiator, carbs, gas tank, front and rear glass all were reinstalled on the car. This job was made even harder because I had to find all the special bolts and nuts that were tossed in Dixie cups to install all the pieces.  I put the weather stripping back on the glass to insulate it from the frame and plastic wrapped it all in place. Shipping windshields is always a risky affair, but I think this was the safest method without using a lot of space in the shipping container.

5763_5

I spent my time filling every nook and cranny to store parts. Every available space was used with the goal to save as much space as we could. The added pressure was the truck with the container was going to wait for us to fill it and my flight out of town was only a couple of hours later. We wouldn’t have the luxury of loading the car and filling the container at our leisure, so I crammed everything in.

5763_6

This reminded me about a joke passed around in my previous career in TV when I used to work with a music instrument rental company in NYC called SIR, Studio Instrument Rentals. We used to say their motto was “Pack tight, drive fast!” We also used to say “SIR” stood for “Stoned Inefficient Roadies,” but that was a whole other joke.

5763_7

After about 16 hours of work, we managed to get everything ready to ship. The truck arrived with its 20 foot sea container, and we carefully rolled the car inside. We were right at the load limits of the dolly wheels, but managed to get it into place and strapped down for her trip across the ocean . We ended up having only the transmission and rear axle strapped to a pallet,  but we barely had enough room! I’m sure glad I made sure we crammed the car with all those parts!

 

 

Monterey Car Shows

I’m all registered and ready to attend Concorso on Saturday 15th of August and the FCA event on Monday August 17th. Please contact Concorso, or the FCA to register for their respective events.

We’re planning a tailgate party after the show at Concorso to avoid the traffic leaving the show. There’s nothing worse that sitting in bumper to bumper traffic watching the car overheat trying to leave Concorso at the end of the day, so since all the GTEs and 330 Americas will already be parked together, we can stay a little later and leave when the traffic dies down. As always, everyone is invited!

If you want more information on the car shows contact:

David Wheeler, Editor of GTE Newsletter : David@Ferrari250GTE.com

Tom Wilson, Registrar of GTE Newsletter : tom@ferrari250gte.com

Tom Yang, Webmaster of tomyang.net : tom@tomyang.net

 

At last count, there will be 19 GTEs and 3 330 Americas! If you have one of these cars, don’t miss the opportunity to join us!

 

Here’s a rough schedule of events:

 

Thursday August 13th, Tomyang.net Cocktail Party at Quail Lodge 6-9 (I will confirm exact time as I book the venue)

Saturday August 15th, Concorso Italiano Gathering of the GTEs (and 330 Americas)

Monday August 17th, Ferrari Club National Show and Concours.

 

The Thursday early evening Tomyang.net event is open to all and begins roughly at 5:30 and goes until 8ish. There will be appetizers and a cash bar. It makes a great meeting place to connect with old and new friends and plan for the week ahead. See you there!

 

quailterrace

 

I also plan on trying out Twitter again to see if it will work for our group in Monterey. Follow me at tomyangnet on twitter, and you’ll be able to keep up with where we all are over the week. I’ll try to get it started in the next week or so.