Tomyang.net/Radcliffe Spring Car Show

May 11, 2019


photo E Yang

It was my 11th year co-hosting this show with Richard and Patty Garre and it always starts with getting the Radcliffe Motorcars Shop in order on the Friday before the show.

Photo E Yang

Richard and his right-hand-man John were busy arranging cars inside the shop. This year, they had two Delehayes for display. They’re rare to begin with, but to have two Pebble Beach cars in one space was pretty special.

Photo E Yang

I put everyone to work! I even gave lessons on how to wipe down a Ferrari with detail spray to these younger members of my crew!

Photo E Yang

In between mopping and moving cars, I put together the show parking. It’s always a challenge to arrange the right cars in the right grouping, but luckily the attendees to this show are pretty laid back without any primadonnas!

Photo E Yang

There’s always a little bit to stress on a Saturday morning watching the weather and if everyone will show. After almost a dozen years, I’ve decide not to worry about the weather and to put on this show rain or shine. I believe the fans of this show will come regardless of the weather, and those that come because of the weather are more than welcome to join us. Regardless the turnout, people have a good time!

Photo E Yang

There were plenty of vendors setting up early inside the shop.

Within an hour of opening the gates, we were well onto having a good turnout.

I can always count on the Pantera guys to come!

Four Testarossas were present.

What’s neat about this show is the variety of cars that come down. My friend Dave brought his Marcos, and Joe brought his Abarth!

There’s rare, and then there’s RARE! Here’s a DeTomaso Vallelunga! There were a little more than 50 of these cars built, and I have to admit this was the first one I’ve seen in person!

It’s not often you see a Citroen Traction Avant, but this show allowed the owners to be parked among enthusiasts that actually knew what this car was!

Photo E Yang

We made our usual announcements in the morning, I’m on the left, next to Patty and Richard. John, is on the far right of the picture.

As always, a strong turnout of Vintage Ferraris!

Photo E Yang

I tried my best to meet and greet as many people as I could, and one common comment I got a lot was how this show had a small, personal, friendly atmosphere, and I had to agree. The volume of attendees and cars ebbs and flows from year to year, and we’ve found a nice size that’s manageable. I’ve heard of events all around the country that have exploded in popularity, and have even stopped running due to its overwhelming response. I’m proud of this little car show, and find its size just right!

Photo E Yang

I have to thank Dave, Sam and ____ for working the front gate. They do a great job every year. Thanks guys!

Photo E Yang

There’s always a strong Alfa Romeo attendance to this event, and it’s nice to see the new cars mixing with the vintage cars!

Photo E Yang

I often spend more time chatting with people than I do looking at cars, but I enjoy that just as much. Catching up with old friends, and meeting new ones is all about this hobby and a lot about my business.

There was breakfast and lunch served out back, so there was plenty of things for everyone to do.

Photo E Yang

As I went through the attendance list I started to formulate what kind of a tech session we would run this year. People seem to appreciate a little more in-depth look into the mechanics of these cars, so I needed to come up with a good topic. Originally, I wanted to talk about the Vintage Ferraris, and some of the details under the car, but I could see there were more later model cars registered for this show. We had every version of the V-8 Ferrari starting from the 308 all the way up to 458 in the show field, so we had the start of something interesting for a tech session.

Photo E Yang

John and I started with a walk through beginning with a 246GTS. I discussed the design of the V-6 Ferrari and how it tied into the Pininfarina design direction in the late 60s and early 70s. As we walked down the row, we could see the transformation from the 246GTS to the 308 and on wards to the 348, 355, 360, 430, and 458. I talked about the design, and John talked about the mechanical changes. Having done a few major service repairs on the early V-8 cars, I was able to lend some insight, but soon I had John explaining the differences in the later V-8 cars into the late 90s and newer.

Photo E Yang

Richard and John conveniently had a 355 engine on its cradle removed from a car in the middle of a major service, so our discussion led inside where we could point out the technical challenges and repairs needed to work on these cars.

Here’s some drone video Michael Keyser shot at the event!

 

Another successful Tomyang.net/Radcliffe Spring Car Show was in the books. Thanks for everyone for coming, and thanks for everyone who helped. We’ll see you all next year!