wrinkle paint on various parts

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andrew
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wrinkle paint on various parts

Post by andrew » Sun Feb 27, 2005 4:35 pm

My next project is replacing the spark plug wires and plugs on my car – some of the insulation is a bit fried from being installed too close to the heat shields and it looks like time for this job. There are some great posts on this topic here, and my choices were guided by that advice (Packard 440 wire, Rajah solderless screw cap terminals [RAJ007], and straight spark plug boots [ELE039], all from Restoration Supply Company; with NGK BP6ES plugs from Rockauto.com).

As I undertake this task, I’ve decided also to adjust the valves and, since it will be apart, I want to paint the valve covers and other parts too. I have a few questions:

First, what are the correct finishes for the valve covers, the plug wire collection/routing tubes, the air filter housing, and the air filter housing cover? Currently my valve covers are wrinkle painted, as is the housing cover. The housing body and the plug wire tubes are painted, but not with wrinkle paint. Finally, the Ferrari name is in silver (that is, unpainted) on my valve covers, though I know it should be painted too.

Second, what products have people been happy with for paint removal from these parts?

Third, I’ve come across several brands of wrinkle paint – Eastwood, Krylon, VHT – does anyone have a recommendation for one versus another? They all come simply in “black” – are they all the correct black?

Finally, I’ve seen some threads on here with regard to wrinkle painting procedure, but would appreciate any further tips and advice.

Thanks in advance.
'64 330 America s/n 5109

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Post by Sleeper » Sun Feb 27, 2005 4:49 pm

I got my paint at the Fuller O'Brian paint store. The secret to a good wrinkle is to get the parts hot in the oven first. DO NOT USE YOUR WIFES OVEN, ask me why I know!
I think about 150 degrees would be fine. Then spray them with a heavy coat. You want it just at the point of running. The hot parts will help keep it from running. It has to be applied thick or the wrinke will suck.

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tyang
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Post by tyang » Sun Feb 27, 2005 5:32 pm

Hi Andrew,

valve covers: Wrinkle
the plug wire collection/routing tubes: Wrinkle
the air filter housing, and the air filter housing cover: Semigloss black

As you said, the "Ferrari" on the valve cover should be painted with the rest of the valve cover. Removing the paint is like gilding the lilly.

Paint stripper is probably the best way to get all the old paint off. The toxic stuff "Zip Strip" works for me, unfortunately the latex based stuff never seems strong enough. Power washing the parts afterwards helps a bunch, but be aware where this stuff drains, as I'm sure it's not environmentally friendly.

I recommend VHT wrinkle paint if you're going to use spray cans. The eastwood stuff wrinkles too fine. I haven't tried Krylon, and didn't even know they made it. I've heard great things about powder coating and my consider it in the future. The valve covers get nicked all too often from working on the engine, and having a more durable finish would be better.

As Sleeper said, the trick is hot parts. Before and after painting.

Tom
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Post by Sleeper » Sun Feb 27, 2005 8:18 pm

Also a coating inside the valve covers is recomended. I have been told a Zinc primer, but I think someone here recomended an aircraft sealer that works good. I would like to know what is the best as mine are flaking inside and I need to remove the covers clean them and reseal the inside. Any comments?

Chris Coios

Post by Chris Coios » Sun Feb 27, 2005 8:20 pm

Andrew,

It is convenient to have some tools to do the painting. I suggest making a turntable from a short length of 1x10 or 1x12, long enough to hold the valve cover. Get a "lazy susan" bearing from a hardware store and attach to the board - an easy turntable. This is convenient for rotating the valve cover as you paint instead of running around. You will need a zinc chromate based primer - thin coat only. As mentioned, you need very full coats for the wrinkle paint, but do not run the paint. Spray in one direction and wait for the paint to set up a few minutes, repeat 90 gegrees and again diagonally each way for full coverage and enough paint to wrinkle, waiting between coats. Heat lamps are an excellent source for heating. Pre-arange 6 to eight heat lamps (with safety cages and be careful) pointing diagonally down and aim evenly around to cover all directions of the valve cover. Move the valve cover to the heat lamp set-up when you are done spraying, turn the lamps on. For safety, the lamp area should be away from the spray area. It takes but 5 minutes, and the paint will suddenly wrinkle. Leave the lamps on another five minutes to bake the paint and then shut them and put the cover aside to dry. The lettering and ribs are black, not highlighted, as Tom notes.

The heat lamps work well for large items with mass, but on thin sheet metal (the tubes) or the small bearing castings (throttle) the mass is so small that the heat lamps will wrinkle the paint and then immediately melt the paint to gloss. You need an oven at about 180 degrees for the small/thin parts (to wrinkle the paint slowly) and it does smell terrible, so your family will not be pleased.

See Karl Ludvigsen's book on the factory for a good clear example of the wrinkle texture (picture of a 250 motor)- coarse and linear.

Regarding the air box, the grille part was not painted, but I believe nickel plated, satin. Electroless nickel is probably best approach. However, the grille is spot welded to the base stamping and impractical to remove without destroying it. You have to plate both the base and the grille together, I think, and then mask/paint the base inside and out with semi-gloss black. You can prepare the grille and base by glass bead blasting to bare metal, removing rust and old plating. Takes a long time, many hours. You must go slow and use low pressure to not distort the grille. Do not dwell on any spot too long. After blasting, wash and rinse with denatured alchohol to get rid of glass bead residue, blow dry with compressed air - be sure to get air into all the joints. Straighten and shape the grille to fit to the cover before giving it to the plater. Do not leave the bead blast to the plater. A heavy hand will ruin the grille.

Hope these suggestions help, Chris

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tyang
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Post by tyang » Sun Feb 27, 2005 8:29 pm

Hi Andrew,

Is your air cleaner the open type, or the snorkle type? If they are open, they will need to be nickle plated like Chris says, but if you have a later Series II 330 witht he snorkle type air cleaner, I beleive the whole thing is painted semi gloss black. Eastwood makes a nice "Underhood Black" that has the right finish.

Tom
'63 330 America #5053

andrew
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Post by andrew » Sun Feb 27, 2005 10:09 pm

Yes, it's the snorkle type.
'64 330 America s/n 5109

Jimmyr
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Post by Jimmyr » Sun Feb 27, 2005 10:25 pm

Krylon semigloss black is the easiest spray to apply, and the Rustolem satin black is the most durable but takes loner to dry. As for VHT wrinkle, they have had some clogging problems with their nozzels, but the have solved the problem, so if you get a sputter, take it back or call them and they quickly replace them. Zinc Chromate is sometimes hard to find due to EPA rules, but aircraft useage is allowed, so check with the local FBO at the smaller airports and they will tell you where to pick some up. On inside plug 250's the chain cover is silver and not black wrinkle like the later cars. Jim Riff

Lowell
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Post by Lowell » Sun Feb 27, 2005 10:45 pm

I agree with most of what has been said about the cam cover painting.

When I did mine, I first painted the inside with Red Glyptol insulating varnish. Otherwise, the oil will weep through the porous casting and
spoil the outside paint.

I agree: Thin coating of Zinc Chromate aircraft primer on the outside.

I used VHT wrinkle paint. Hot before and after as folks have described.
I used three coats about 5 min apart as the directions on the can said.

For the initial treatment, I both used paint remover and then bead blasted the covers. But then I spent a very long time cleaning and blowing with an air gun to be sure that no beads were left.

The frist one that I did came out beautiful. The second one not so nice so, as I do all the time on a Ferrari, I did the second cover all over again, paint removal and all.
Lowell Brown
1966 Gold 330 2+2 Series II

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Post by Sleeper » Tue Mar 01, 2005 9:30 am

So what is reccomended for inside the cover. What is Red Glyptol, and where do you find it. Is the Zinc Chromate the best product. I seem to remember some mention of another Aircraft product that was suggested.
Any help here?

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330GT
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Post by 330GT » Tue Mar 01, 2005 9:54 am

Regards, Kerry
http://www.330gt.com 330 GT Registry
http://www.parrotbyte.com/kbc/ferrari 250 PF Coupe 1643GT, 330 GT 2+2 8755GT, 308 GTS 23605

andrew
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Post by andrew » Tue Mar 01, 2005 8:08 pm

Thanks to everyone for the helpful advice and information. I'll be sure to report any additional strategies that might prove useful as I complete this task.
'64 330 America s/n 5109

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Post by Sleeper » Wed Mar 02, 2005 9:27 pm

Now here's another question. I stopped by my local powder coater to see what they can do in wrinkle powder coating. Well not much. The finish is only going to be mottled at best and nothing like the spray paint wrinkle finish. Is this guy missing something or are people actually using this finish. I wouldn't!!!

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tyang
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Post by tyang » Wed Mar 02, 2005 11:54 pm

I remember seeing wrinkle paint done by a powdercoater that looked pretty good. Let me see if I can get some more information for you.

Tom
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Lowell
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Post by Lowell » Thu Mar 03, 2005 2:09 am

Did a powder coat too once: I had the plenum on my 308 QV powder coated with red wrinkle. Looks very nice. But it is a somewhat finer wrinkle than that on the black 330 cam covers.
Lowell Brown
1966 Gold 330 2+2 Series II

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